Welcome! Login | Register
 

The Strategies to Win the White House in 2020 – The Sunday Political Brunch March 24, 2019—The Strategies to Win the White House in…

2019 NFL Free Agency – Checking In On The Seattle Seahawks—2019 NFL Free Agency – Checking In On…

VIDEO: Mueller Report Delivered to United States Attorney General Barr UPDATED—VIDEO: Mueller Report Delivered to United States Attorney…

2019 NCAA Tournament – How To Set Your March Madness Bracket Around Pac-12 Teams—2019 NCAA Tournament – How To Set Your…

March Madness 2019 – Can The Oregon Ducks Get Back To The Elite Eight?—March Madness 2019 – Can The Oregon Ducks…

I Have 3 Months To Train For The Wild Rogue Relay—I Have 3 Months To Train For The…

20 Ways To Increase Circulation—20 Ways To Increase Circulation

Trail Blazers Weekly Preview – Sabonis 2.0, Dirk’s Rip City Swan Song, Blake Of House Piston Invades—Trail Blazers Weekly Preview – Sabonis 2.0, Dirk’s…

VIDEO: ‘Surf Rock’ Creator Dick Dale Dead at 81—VIDEO: 'Surf Rock' Creator Dick Dale Dead at…

The Presidential Primary Parade Marches On - Sunday Political Brunch March 17, 2019—The Presidential Primary Parade Marches On - Sunday…

 
 

Portland Then/Now: Southwest Third Ave. and Burnside St.

Thursday, October 09, 2014

 

SW 3rd and Burnside

SW 3rd Avenue and Burnside Street. City of Portland Archives. A2009-009

SW 3rd and Burnside

Southwest Third Avenue and Burnside Street. Photo by Byron Beck.

Southwest Third Avenue and Burnside Street is one of the major intersections in our city.

It has also seen major changes throughout its history.

THEN: This photo from 1913—Oct. 18 to be exact—features a Burnside Street scene that includes a "U.S. Army Recruiting Station" window sign, the Woodlawn trolley, All Nations Saloon, and horse-drawn carriages. And men. There seems to be only one woman featured in this particular photo.  

Notice the old Burnside Bridge in the distance. 

NOW: The more recent photo of the intersection of Southwest Third and Burnside Street was shot 99 years later, on the morning of Oct. 8, 2014. Many of the original buildings are long gone.

Horse-drawn carriages have been replaced by pedicabs that take visitors to nearby tourists haunts such as Voodoo Doughnuts and Saturday Market. Other attractions in this Old Town neighborhood include Dante's and the controversial Right 2 Dream Too homeless camp.

One thing that hasn't changed is the longest-running family owned restaurant in Oregon, Dan & Louis Oyster Bar, still standing on nearby Southwest Ankeny Street. The seafood restaurant was only 6 years old when the 1913 photograph was clicked. 

 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

 
Delivered Free Every
Day to Your Inbox