Welcome! Login | Register
 

NEW: President Trump Signs Executive Order Ending Family Separation—NEW: President Trump Signs Executive Order Ending Family…

Some Presidential Father’s Day Trivia—The Sunday Political Brunch—June 17, 2018—Some Presidential Father’s Day Trivia -- The Sunday…

How Good Will The Seattle Seahawks’ Pass Rush Be In 2018?—How Good Will The Seattle Seahawks’ Pass Rush…

Fecteau: Shaking Hands with the Devil—Fecteau: Shaking Hands with the Devil

One Suicide Too Many, MINDSETTER™ Matt Fecteau—One Suicide Too Many, MINDSETTER™ Matt Fecteau

The California Political Earthquake? - Sunday Political Brunch - June 10, 2018—The California Political Earthquake? - Sunday Political Brunch…

Three Seattle Seahawks Players You Should Be Talking About—Three Seattle Seahawks Players You Should Be Talking…

Gardening For Health—Gardening For Health

The Political Dog Daze of Summer—Sunday Political Brunch June 3, 2018—The Political Dog Daze of Summer -- Sunday…

Weiss: AARP Gives Us a Snapshot of the Millennial Caregiver—Weiss: AARP Gives Us a Snapshot of the…

 
 

Besaw’s Vandalized On Last Day of Business

Tuesday, June 02, 2015

 

Besaw’s restaurant’s Facebook page posted this photo on Friday, showing former tenant Cana Flug and several former employees standing in front of the building, already stripped of its awning and sign.

In the midst of a trademark feud and recent lawsuit, Besaw’s landlord Jim John of C.E. John’s woke up Monday morning relieved that at least one battle had ended; the iconic NW building’s former tenant, restaurant operator Cana Flug, had turned over the keys and moved out of the space that weekend after the restaurant’s final day of business on Friday. 

When he arrived at the property later that morning, however, John was confronted with an unpleasant surprise. 

The exterior’s familiar black and white striped awning had been stripped away, along with the electric “Besaw’s” sign that had been hanging there since 1930. On the front door was a “derogatory” note addressed to “the landlord,” John said. 

A photo of the altered building was posted on the Besaw’s restaurant’s Facebook page on Friday, showing Flug and several former employees standing in front of the building, already stripped of its awning and sign. 

“That was a Northwest icon, and they didn’t have the right to remove this,” John said Tuesday morning. “The note is directed at the landlord, but, frankly, with the destruction, it’s really directed at the entire Northwest neighborhood.”  

The changed exterior was only half of the transformation. Upon unlocking the front door, John discovered the tiles in the entryway that had spelled “1903,” the building’s establishment date, had been chipped out and replaced by other tile. Additionally, the barstools which had been bolted to the floor had been removed, along with all other signage associated with the Besaw’s name – down to a sign in the parking lot. 

“I felt a lot of sadness,” John said. “We tried to do what we could do to protect it, but we couldn’t. When somebody decides they’re going to do something like this, there’s not much we can do.” 

The building showed no sign of forced entry, leading John to suspect the former tenants had performed the alterations during the turnover period that weekend. 

Flug has not yet returned requests for comment from GoLocalPDX. 

“This was a slap in the face to everybody,” John said. “Anybody who enjoyed going to Besaw’s, and sitting on those barstools, basically got a big ‘up yours.’” 

Flug and C.E. John’s have been in an ongoing trademark battle over the Besaw’s name, with both filing competing applications for ownership of the name with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office earlier this year. Additionally, Flug’s Tuatara Enterprises also filed a lawsuit claiming “common law ownership” over the Besaw’s brand in U.S. District Court in Portland in May. 

“[Flug] has been aggressively after the name and image of Besaw’s, when it’s very clear in the documents that she doesn’t own it… to the point that somebody felt the need to take everything,” John said. “Nobody can enjoy it anymore. It’s really sad.” 

 

Related Slideshow: Where to Dine Out in Portland’s 10 Hottest Restaurant Neighborhoods

Find the Best ranked Portland neighborhoods according to number of restaurants per capita. The top restaurant neighborhoods included the Lloyd district, Old Town, The Pearl and more - all of which have an abundance of hip, tasty places to dine. Here are GoLocalPDX's picks for where to dine out in Portland's 10 hottest restaurant neighborhoods. 

Prev Next

10.

Salty's, Sunderland

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in Sunderland: 99.4

Salty's sits on the waterfront of the Columbia River, and serves up delicious seafood and steak daily. 

3839 N.E. Marine Drive. 

Photo via saltys.com

Prev Next

9.

PAADEE, Kerns Neighborhood

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in Kerns: 101.2 

Paa dee, which means "to bring good things," serves up sophisticated thai dishes and craft cocktails daily. 

6 SE 28th Avenue. 

Photo via paadeepdx.com

Prev Next

8.

Nostrana, Buckman Neighborhood

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in Buckman: 121.6

Enjoy a slice of Italy at Nostrana - serving up fine wines, cocktails and Italian style lunch and dinner dishes every day. 

1401 SE Morrison Street. 

Photo via nostrana.com

Prev Next

7.

¿Por Que No?, Boise Neighborhood

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in Boise: 123.9

¿Por Que No? Taqueria strives for sustainability using locally harvested meat and recycled materials, while serving up delectable mexican flavors. 

3524 N Mississippi Avenue.

Prev Next

6.

Paley's Place, Northwest District

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in the Northwest District: 127.6

Paley's place - with only 50 seats - provides guests an intimate and sophisticated dining experience.  

1204 Northwest 21st Avenue. 

Photo via paleysplace.net

Prev Next

5.

Andina, The Pearl

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in the Pearl: 155.3

Visit Andina in the Pearl district for a unique, elegant taste of Peru. 

1314 Northwest Glisan Street. 

Photo via andinarestaurant.com

Prev Next

4.

Wilfs, Old Town Chinatown

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in the Pearl: 178.2 

The 1950's inspired restaurant and lounge, Wilfs, serves classic American style cuisine and often hosts live jazz musicians.

800 NW 6th Avenue.  

Photo via wilfsrestaurant.com

Prev Next

3.

Shandong, Hollywood District

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in the Hollywwod District: 219.6

This classic Chinese eatery features hand-pulled noodles in unique, authentic cuisine. 

3724 NE Broadway. 

Photo via shandongportland.com

Prev Next

2.

Departure, Downtown

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in Downtown: 227.3

Departure Restaurant and Lounge featuring head chef Gregory Gourdet, not only provides guests with one of the best views in Portland, but also serves up-scale asian-fusion cuisine. 

525 SW Morrison Street. 

Photo via departureportland.com

Prev Next

1.

Frank's Noodle House, Lloyd District

Number of restaurants per 10,000 residents in the Lloyd District: 499.1

Frank's serves up traditional Chinese eats in a refurbished house, and specializes in traditional hand-pulled noodles with meat or vegetables.

822 NE Broadway. 

 
 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

 

X

Stay Connected — Free
Daily Email