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Oregon Could Be Major Obstacle in Bernie Sanders’ Presidential Campaign

Friday, July 03, 2015

 

Last week National Public Radio reported that under an obscure New Hampshire law, US Senator -- and presidential candidate -- Bernie Sanders may not be able to access the ballot for the first in the nation Primary Election next year. Hailing from the neighboring Vermont, Sanders' campaign is counting on a bump in the state that will help him down the line. Since he cannot affirm that he is a member of the Democratic Party, he may be denied access.

Sanders issues in New Hampshire may not signal the end of his troubles. Sanders is not affiliated with any party but identifies as a Socialist. His lack of party registration may even harm him in Oregon, a fiercely independent state since he is trying to be the Democratic nominee.

In Oregon, you must be a member of a political party at least 180 days prior to the deadline to file for a partisan officer. While they can petition for ballot access, the Secretary of State in Oregon has the sole authority to simply grant ballot access to presidential candidates. What happens when a presidential candidate not a member of either major party runs? That is unknown but a question that will soon come to the forefront.

When asked, Tony Green, Communications Director for Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins, responded with this:

"ORS 249.046 requires candidates for a major political party to be a member of the party at least 180 days prior to the deadline to file for the election. The statute is unambiguous. However, ORS 249.078 also provides requirements for presidential candidates of a major political party and does not specifically refer to 249.046. Because we expect this question to arise prior to the 2016 Primary Election, we plan to ask the Department of Justice for their assessment."

According to that assessment, it appears Sanders' spot on the ballot may be in peril. If he is allowed on the ballot, he can earn delegates to the Democratic Convention. Since they have no rules requiring a candidate be registered in their party, it appears states such as New Hampshire and Oregon might be one of Sanders' biggest obstacles in his decidedly long-shot campaign for President.

 

Related Slideshow: U.S. Supreme Court Marriage Ruling Rally

A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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Rep. Suzanne Bonamici and Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum

A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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 Gov. Kate Brown's Deputy General Counsel Misha Isaak

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In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

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A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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Former Portland Mayor Tom Potter, Katie, Madi and Mackenzie Potter

A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish

A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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Sen. Jeff Merkley

A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

Prev Next

A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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Basic Rights Oregon Jeana Frazzini and her fiancée Collin McFadyen

A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

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A lunchtime rally in downtown Portland marked the the U.S. Supreme Court's momentous decision to support marriage equality for all Americans. 

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

 
 

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