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Don’t Miss These 30 Fruits and Vegetables at Your Farmers Market

Saturday, March 26, 2016

 

Farmers Market Produce

Like a photoshopped still-frame, the produce section of your average grocery store is often unchanging, despite turning seasons and changing weather. Refrigeration, chemical preservation and shipping allow shoppers to find familiar fruits and vegetables year-round — carrots and apples all cleaned, waxed and stacked in the customary quasi-pyramids of produce.

Though eating this way is convenient, many argue that it is not ideal for our bodies or the environment. Eating produce as it naturally grows by season not only provides more nutrients and promotes a healthier microbiome, but also allows for healthier crop rotation. Additionally, eating locally sourced fruits and vegetables helps your home-town farmers.

To assist those on their path to healthfulness, HealthGrove used data from the ESHA nutrition database to find the 15 healthiest fruits and 15 healthiest vegetables to keep an eye out for this spring and summer at your farmers markets and local produce stands. These are ranked by their nutrient score, which looks at the ratio of “good” nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, to “bad nutrients,” like cholesterol, fat and sugar.

The slide show presents all fruits, followed by all vegetables.

Note: Though serving sizes may differ for these fruits and vegetables, it does not affect their nutrient score.

#15. Nectarine

 

Calories: 69
Serving Size: 1.0 piece (156 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (14% DV)

#14. Navel Orange

 

Calories: 40
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (82.5 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (81.3% DV)

#13. Blueberries

 

Calories: 42
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (74 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (17.9% DV)

#12. Red Grapefruit

 

Calories: 48
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (115 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin A (59.8% DV)

#11. Apricot

 

Calories: 40
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (82.5 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin A (31.8% DV)

#10. Pineapple

 

Calories: 28
Serving Size: 1.0 piece (56 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (44.6% DV)

#9. Kumquats

 

Calories: 13
Serving Size: 1.0 piece (19 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (13.9% DV)

#8. Guava

 

Calories: 37
Serving Size: 1.0 guava (55 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (209.3% DV)

#7. Strawberries

 

Calories: 45
Serving Size: 20.0 berries (140 grams)
Nutrient Score: A-
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (137.2% DV)

#6. Lemon

 

Calories: 24
Serving Size: 1.0 lemon (84 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (74.2% DV)

#5. Cranberries

 

Calories: 25
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (55 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (12.2% DV)

#4. Raspberries

 

Calories: 32
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (61.5 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (26.9% DV)

#3. Blackberries

 

Calories: 31
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (72 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (25.2% DV)

#2. Lime

 

Calories: 20
Serving Size: 1.0 lime (67 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (32.5% DV)

#1. Rhubarb

 

Calories: 11
Serving Size: 1.0 piece (51 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (18.7% DV)

Though Rhubarb is scientifically regarded as a vegetable, the USDA categorizes it as a fruit. If it had been compared as a vegetable, it would have ranked at No.9.

#15. Leeks

 

Calories: 4
Serving Size: 1.0 slice (6 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Magnesium (7% DV)

#14. Green Beans

 

Calories: 31
Serving Size: 1.0 cup (100 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (20.3% DV)

#13. Green Peas

 

Calories: 59
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (72.5 grams)
Nutrient Score: A
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (48.3% DV)

#12. Kohlrabi

 

Calories: 4
Serving Size: 1.0 slice (16 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (16.5% DV)

#11. Green Bell Pepper

 

Calories: 5
Serving Size: 10.0 pieces (27 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (36.2% DV)

#10. Portobello Mushrooms

 

Calories: 18
Serving Size: 1.0 mushroom (84 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin D (93.7% DV)

#9. Carrots

 

Calories: 1
Serving Size: 1.0 slice (3 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin A (10% DV)

#8. Arugula

 

Calories: 5
Serving Size: 1.0 cup (20 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (27.2% DV)

#7. Scallions

 

Calories: 6
Serving Size: 4.0 scallions (20 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (51.8% DV)

#6. Mustard Greens

 

Calories: 15
Serving Size: 1.0 cup (56 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (180.3% DV)

#5. Garlic

 

Calories: 4
Serving Size: 1.0 teaspoon (2.8 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Selenium (20.3% DV)

#4. Okra

 

Calories: 31
Serving Size: 8.0 okra (95 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (37.2% DV)

#3. Broccoli Rabe

 

Calories: 4
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (20 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (56% DV)

#2. Yam

 

Calories: 89
Serving Size: 0.5 cup (75 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin C (21.4% DV)

#1. Kale

 

Calories: 8
Serving Size: 1.0 cup (16 grams)
Nutrient Score: A+
Good Source Of: Vitamin K (141% DV)

Research More Nutrition Facts on HealthGrove

 

Related Slideshow: Top 5 Backpacking Foods You Never Knew You Needed

Prev Next

5. Wakame Seaweed

With only a bit of water, a few grams of dried seaweed blossoms into a nutrient-rich forest. Vegan, gluten free, rich in calcium, iron and folate, and it only weighs in at 1.6 oz per half cup. Throw a tablespoon of wakame into ramen noodle soups. Wakame seaweed can also be soaked in room temperature water for a refreshing salad. Add a package of tuna and some almonds from your trail mix for a satisfying lunch. 

Prev Next

4. Salami

Although relatively heavy, salami is worth packing along for its versatility.  Salami can be cubed and fried in pasta or rice dishes, sliced thinly for sandwiches, or just chomp a hunk off with your teeth while beating your chest savagely. Unlike fresh deli meats or even Spam, it can last for days unrefrigerated. 

Prev Next

3. Crystallized Eggs

Forget the powdered variety, which when mixed with water omits a vague odor similar to cat pee. Thanks to food scientists, we can now purchase crystallized eggs to stir into soups, boiled with instant rice, or turned into scrambled eggs for a protein rich breakfast. Go for the ‘Ova Easy’ brand. At $54.99 for a 2.25 lb can it is not cheap, but the can lasts for 5 years on the shelf and the superior taste is worth it. 

Prev Next

2. Spice Wheel

A must for elevating bland, high-carb backpacking foods. Personalize by choosing which spices you want in the wheel’s 6-8 compartments. After your fourth meal of pasta, you’ll be thankful you can choose curry or cumin to keep your tongue happy. Spice wheels are widely available for less than four bucks and make great gifts for your outdoorsy friends and family. 

Photo credit: camperpartsworld.com

Prev Next

A Plastic Mug With a Lid

Okay, okay, so it’s not a food, but one lidded cup replaces a bowl, plate and drinking cup while on the trail. Cups can store your coffee and tea in the morning and your apricot cashew couscous in the evening. Purchase ones with screw-on lids double as tupperware for transporting leftovers. Some brands are clear plastic with measurements on the side for easy camp cooking. We love GSI Outdoors ‘Fairshare’ Mug, starting at $8.75 each. 

Photo: GSI Outdoors Fairshare Mug via rei.com 

 
 

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